Behind Headlines: 180 Seconds in Ad Tech — Privacy, Policy, & Supply Chain Issues

3
at
3
minutes
Technical Level
October 15, 2021
Vanessa Purchio
Marketing Communications Specialist
Ari Belliu
Marketing Communications Specialist

This week in Behind Headlines: 180 Seconds in Ad Tech we cover how Facebook will count users with unlinked Facebook and Instagram accounts as two separate people. Supply chain issues forcing brands to either cut their ad spend or change their marketing strategy. Android’s new approximate targeting options give users more privacy over their location data. DoorDash now delivers ads as a way to leverage user data to turn a profit. And lastly, how Google is banning climate change misinformation, in a new editorial stance towards news curation.

Hey there! This is Vanessa & Ari at Sharethrough. In this episode we'll be giving you a quick recap of what happened the week of October 11th in ad tech, in 180 seconds. Let’s go!

Starting Monday of this week, Facebook will treat users who don’t opt-in to link their Facebook and Instagram accounts as two separate users.  Earlier in September, Facebook launched their Account Center to make Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger more interoperable. The new update rolls back that decision and gives users more control over how their information is used for ads. While this is a more privacy-centric approach for users, it may affect how advertisers measure and estimate audience reach and sizes. (Source: AdExchanger, Facebook)

Business Insider reports that due to supply chain issues, a major cut in ad spend is expected in 2022, along with a change in direction for campaigns. Lack of raw materials, resources, and transportation delays within the supply chain are forcing brands to rethink their current & upcoming marketing campaigns. For instance, Audi has already shifted the focus from their electric vehicle ad campaign to a more high-level branding that reaches potential future customers. (Source: Business Insider, AdExchanger)

Google added a new tracking option to smartphones with Android 12 and up, allowing users to share “approximate location data” up to around a mile or so. Apps still have the option to ask for more accurate tracking if a user has already given approximate location data, but Google recommends starting with a request to accurately track users while the app is in use, or “foreground location tracking”. This change gives users more privacy and control, but may hurt advertisers who relied on accurate location data. (Source: Android, AdExchanger)

DoorDash is now delivering restaurant ads. According to The Wall Street Journal, restaurants now have the option of using paid media on DoorDash to rank above organic searches. While the options are basic for now, like targeting new or returning customers, DoorDash plans to expand their options to more contextual targeting such as “frequent pizza purchasers”. Uber, Instacart, and other non-advertising businesses are also offering ads on their platforms, trying to use ad revenue to bridge the gap between being unprofitable, and growing user retention rates. (Source: The Wall Street Journal, AdExchanger)

Google is taking a more editorial approach to content moderation on their platforms and ad network when it banned some anti-vax activists on YouTube last week. Taking this one step further, Google announced this week it’ll ban ads that distribute or promote climate change misinformation. Google will also ban anti-vax content for all approved vaccines, not just COVID-19. The policy will affect search responses and ads across Google’s publisher network. Parallel to the policy change, Google is also working on curating live news feeds, called Big Moments. A step out of their comfort zone, they’ll have to make subjective choices on which news story or content is best. (Source: The Information, AdExchanger)

Thanks for tuning in! For more in-depth information or to subscribe to these weekly updates, check out the links in our blog. This has been Vanessa & Ari at Sharethrough for our weekly 180 second-recap in Ad tech. See you next week! 

About Behind Headlines: 180 Seconds in Ad Tech—

Behind Headlines: 180 Seconds in Ad Tech is a short 3-minute podcast exploring the news in the digital advertising industry. Ad tech is a fast-growing industry with many updates happening daily. As it can be hard for most to keep up with the latest news, the Sharethrough team wanted to create an audio series compiling notable mentions each week.

This week in Behind Headlines: 180 Seconds in Ad Tech we cover how Facebook will count users with unlinked Facebook and Instagram accounts as two separate people. Supply chain issues forcing brands to either cut their ad spend or change their marketing strategy. Android’s new approximate targeting options give users more privacy over their location data. DoorDash now delivers ads as a way to leverage user data to turn a profit. And lastly, how Google is banning climate change misinformation, in a new editorial stance towards news curation.

Hey there! This is Vanessa & Ari at Sharethrough. In this episode we'll be giving you a quick recap of what happened the week of October 11th in ad tech, in 180 seconds. Let’s go!

Starting Monday of this week, Facebook will treat users who don’t opt-in to link their Facebook and Instagram accounts as two separate users.  Earlier in September, Facebook launched their Account Center to make Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger more interoperable. The new update rolls back that decision and gives users more control over how their information is used for ads. While this is a more privacy-centric approach for users, it may affect how advertisers measure and estimate audience reach and sizes. (Source: AdExchanger, Facebook)

Business Insider reports that due to supply chain issues, a major cut in ad spend is expected in 2022, along with a change in direction for campaigns. Lack of raw materials, resources, and transportation delays within the supply chain are forcing brands to rethink their current & upcoming marketing campaigns. For instance, Audi has already shifted the focus from their electric vehicle ad campaign to a more high-level branding that reaches potential future customers. (Source: Business Insider, AdExchanger)

Google added a new tracking option to smartphones with Android 12 and up, allowing users to share “approximate location data” up to around a mile or so. Apps still have the option to ask for more accurate tracking if a user has already given approximate location data, but Google recommends starting with a request to accurately track users while the app is in use, or “foreground location tracking”. This change gives users more privacy and control, but may hurt advertisers who relied on accurate location data. (Source: Android, AdExchanger)

DoorDash is now delivering restaurant ads. According to The Wall Street Journal, restaurants now have the option of using paid media on DoorDash to rank above organic searches. While the options are basic for now, like targeting new or returning customers, DoorDash plans to expand their options to more contextual targeting such as “frequent pizza purchasers”. Uber, Instacart, and other non-advertising businesses are also offering ads on their platforms, trying to use ad revenue to bridge the gap between being unprofitable, and growing user retention rates. (Source: The Wall Street Journal, AdExchanger)

Google is taking a more editorial approach to content moderation on their platforms and ad network when it banned some anti-vax activists on YouTube last week. Taking this one step further, Google announced this week it’ll ban ads that distribute or promote climate change misinformation. Google will also ban anti-vax content for all approved vaccines, not just COVID-19. The policy will affect search responses and ads across Google’s publisher network. Parallel to the policy change, Google is also working on curating live news feeds, called Big Moments. A step out of their comfort zone, they’ll have to make subjective choices on which news story or content is best. (Source: The Information, AdExchanger)

Thanks for tuning in! For more in-depth information or to subscribe to these weekly updates, check out the links in our blog. This has been Vanessa & Ari at Sharethrough for our weekly 180 second-recap in Ad tech. See you next week! 

About Calibrate—

Founded in 2015, Calibrate is a yearly conference for new engineering managers hosted by seasoned engineering managers. The experience level of the speakers ranges from newcomers all the way through senior engineering leaders with over twenty years of experience in the field. Each speaker is greatly concerned about the craft of engineering management. Organized and hosted by Sharethrough, it was conducted yearly in September, from 2015-2019 in San Francisco, California.

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